Services

Building and Road Construction

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are

Architecture  and Planing

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are

Irrigation and land reconciliation

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are

Drainage and water supply

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are

construction Management

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are

Steel Fabrication

Peat excavation and replacement is however only generally economic for the shallower depths of peat where excavation quantities are likely to be small. Experience in the ROADEX countries suggests that the economic limit for the excavation method normally lies somewhere between 3 and 4 metres of peat for public roads. The actual economic depth at a particular location will depend on the local parameters, e.g. the type of peat, the area of peat, the cost of the backfill material, availability of spoil areas, etc. (Note: Wind farm developers in Scotland currently consider the economic depth to be 1.0m to 1.5m of peat.) What can be said with some certainty is that after 4m of excavation it will become increasingly more difficult to keep the peat excavation sides stable.

The excavation method is not without its disadvantages:

  • In deeper bogs local pockets of peat can be left unexcavated. These can produce bearing capacity problems and settlements in the finished embankment where they are left in place;
  • If the peat has a low shear strength, the sideslopes of the excavations may become unstable and slide into the excavations before they can be backfilled. This can significantly increase the expected excavation quantities;
  • Adjacent structures and buildings alongside the excavation may be adversely affected by the removal of the side support if not adequately protected;
  • Suitable storage areas need to be identified locally for the disposal of the excavated peat;
  • The new embankment can act as a linear drain and affect the hydrology of the are